George Weah and Liberia – fighting (for) corruption and democracy?

“Football is a simple game. Twenty-two men chase a ball for 90 minutes and at the end…” you become president of Liberia. Yes, the Germans usually win, but this is not what George Weah took from Gary Lineker’s famous quote. The 1990’s football superstar is now Liberia’s second democratically elected head of State (after the wars), an incredibly hard position to hold in one of Africa’s most war-torn countries. His election in 2017 was stamped by the want for a renewed democracy in a country ravaged by civil wars, political coups, poverty and corruption. Continuer de lire « George Weah and Liberia – fighting (for) corruption and democracy? »

The Emergence of Populism and the Delegitimation of Facts: a very global issue

Until the beginning of the digital era, whenever authoritarian governments felt uncomfortable with the critics, they would engage in the censorship of these so-called deserters of the nation and in the hegemonic control of the media, the academia and other institutions related to the production or the spread of information. In the twenty-first century, populist movements currently in power or even those that were not so successful in the last elections seem to demonstrate a common discomfort when faced with specific democratic values – such as the possibility of dissent – however, they no longer employ old-fashioned strategies to hide the parts of reality that they do not want to be shown to the public. As developed further in this article, populist leaders in the digital era who share a common authoritarian mentality can exploit more sophisticated tactics to silence their critics. Continuer de lire « The Emergence of Populism and the Delegitimation of Facts: a very global issue »